Global Network Courses

September-December 2016 Courses | January-May 2016 Courses | September-December 2015 Courses | January–May 2015 Courses August-December 2014 Courses | January-May 2014 Courses | August-December 2013 Courses

Global Network Courses are for-credit courses offered virtually by a member school and open to students from throughout the network. The courses link students through an online platform and video conferencing for lectures and discussions. As part of the courses, groups of students from multiple member schools collaborate virtually on substantial team projects, developing teamwork skills and cross-cultural perspectives.

The courses can be thought of as small network online courses, or SNOCs. In contrast to the massive online open courses (MOOCs) offered by many institutions, in which unscreened participants have varying degrees of interest and capabilities, SNOCs enroll a select group of top-tier MBA students engaged in a common effort to build management skills.

By bringing together MBA candidates from member schools as part of their regular coursework, the courses harness the strengths of the Global Network on a daily basis.


Global Network Courses: September – December 2016

Sources and Uses of Power
Fernando Martin Y. Roxas
Asian Institute of Management

Dates: September 6 – October 13, 2016, Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Wednesday, October 12
Class meeting times: 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. (Manila time)

The course Sources and Uses of Power (SUPR) explores the relationship between sources and the nature of influencing factors on the behavior of people in varying social, economic, cultural and organizational contexts.  Putting emphasis on applying and explaining why people react the way they do to stimuli, SUPR relies on understanding systemic structures to explain people’s behavior and reactions. GNAM SUPR is designed as an applied systems thinking course.

SUPR will use movies, documentaries, field visits/interviews and discussion cases as learning materials, which will serve as springboard to plenary class discussions. This elective will take a look at sources of power in different contexts such as crisis, governance, social justice, transport systems and renewable energy, among others.

Students will be responsible for accessing the necessary knowledge materials (listed at the end of course outline).  They are expected to participate in synchronous and plenary discussions, discussion boards, submit individual reflection papers, and work with others in class on a group project.  The group project will require an analysis of a movie or a documentary, in the form of a video presentation and to be shared in the SUPR Canvas for other members of the class to view.

GNAM Students: Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply.

New Product Development
Avraham Shtub
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

October 24-December 5, 2016, Mondays (October 24, 31; November 7, 14, 21, 28; Final presentations on December 5) 
Class meeting time: Monday, 8:00 – 11:00 a.m. EST

In today's world New Product Development (NPD) is critical to the success and survival of organizations. This course is aimed at teaching the tools and techniques developed to support the NPD process, to gain insight from real NPD success and failure case studies and to implement the tools, techniques and insights in a simulated environment.

Urban Resilience: Complexity, Collaborative Structures, and Leadership Challenges

Murali Chandrashekaran, Sauder, University of British Columbia
Bradford S. Gentry, Yale School of Management and Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Sourav Mukherji, IIM-Bangalore
Gordon Abekah Nkrumah, University of Ghana Business School
Carlos Scheel, EGADE Business School

Dates: September 6 – January 20th
Class meeting times: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30–10:00am EST

The world continues to urbanize.  In the 100 years starting 1913, the proportion of the world’s population that live in cities grew 5-fold from 10% to 50%, and estimates suggest that 75% of the world’s population will live in cities in 2050.

Though history reveals that urbanization has always been an accelerator of growth and development, it also poses profound challenges for corporates, communities, cities, and countries.  A recent McKinsey report succinctly notes: “Cities are essential to global economic growth and productivity. They are where most of the world’s population live, work, and play, and they are important to everyone else, too. They are the world’s economic engine, consuming the majority of global power and resources, while generating 80 percent of GDP and 70 percent of greenhouse-gas emissions. Making cities great is the critical infrastructure challenge of this century.”

This course is a collaborative offering to the GNAM network. It brings together five schools in the GNAM network (Sauder School of Business, Yale SOM, IIM-B, Ghana Business School, and EGADE Business School), the 100 Resilient Cities network (www.100resilientcities.org), the Rockefeller Foundation (www.rockefellerfoundation.org), and practitioners from business, government, and civil society to engage with the topic of urban resilience.

The key non-academic partners in the course are the Rockefeller Foundation (RF) and the 100 Resilient Citiesinitiative (100RC). In 2013, RF pioneered the 100RC initiative to help cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st century.

In April 2013, GNAM became a platform partner of 100RC to help cities in the design and implementation of resilience strategies.

100RC supports the adoption and incorporation of a view of resilience that includes not just the shocks—earthquakes, fires, floods, etc.—but also the stresses that weaken the fabric of a city on a day to day or cyclical basis.

Examples of these stresses include high unemployment; an overtaxed or inefficient public transportation system; endemic violence; or chronic food and water shortages. By addressing both the shocks and the stresses, a city becomes more able to respond to adverse events, and is overall better able to deliver basic functions in both good times and bad, to all populations.

Cities in the 100RC network are provided with the resources necessary to develop a roadmap to resilience along four main pathways:

• Financial and logistical guidance for establishing an innovative new position in city government, a Chief Resilience Officer (CRO), who will lead the city’s resilience efforts

• Expert support for development of a robust resilience strategy

• Access to solutions, service providers, and partners from the private, public and NGO sectors who can help them develop and implement their resilience strategies

• Membership of a global network of member cities who can learn from and help each other.

Through these actions, 100RC aims not only to help individual cities become more resilient, but will facilitate thbuilding of a global practice of resilience among governments, NGOs, the private sector, and individual citizens

Global Network Courses: January – May 2016

International Management & Organizational Structures
Raúl Montalvo
EGADE Business School

Dates: Tuesdays and Fridays (February: 2, 5, 9, 12, 16, 23, 26; March: 1, 8, 11, 29; April 1)
Class meeting times: Tuesdays and Fridays, 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. (CST in Mexico, Mexico City time)

**Please note that in the US clocks will move one hour forward on March 13; and in Europe clocks will move one hour forward on March 27; clocks will not change in Mexico until April 3**

Even when today we can talk about a globalized world, it is important to understand that the local, national or regional nature of business is still one of the most important components when strategic decision making takes place. There are many cases of multinational companies which have been very successful locally or regionally and when they try to export their business model abroad the results can be mixed. The markets have such a wide diversity in terms of infrastructure, culture, purchasing power, legal framework, geography, market composition, weather, consumer behavior, amongst others. One can find evidence from many companies that after they went global had to change and adapt their businesses or even further in some cases to rethink it, not only in terms of adapting their products, but also their logistics for delivery, governance and organizational structure, to mention some.  At the end, it is important to understand that the global business environment is influenced by its own environment in a local, regional or national context and how is it that global companies have to adapt internally and externally.

The course will be composed of classes, discussion forums, interviews and a team final project. During the course we will be combining the analysis from three main angles: business context (economic figures of the country or region, business framework, consumer behavior, etc.), business model and business expansion strategy: evidence (case discussion and evidence of the strategy used and its implications when a group of companies from different countries and sectors went global). All of these supported as indicated above with guest speakers who did participate in the expansion of their companies and who will share their experience with the class.

At the end of the course as a final project the students in groups, will have to analyze the best strategy for a local company that may want to become global.

GNAM Students: Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply.

Political Strategies of Multinational Companies
Gilberto Sarfati
FGV-EAESP

View video introduction from Prof. Sarfati

Dates: Tuesdays and Fridays (February: 23; March: 1, 8, 22, 29; April 5, 12, 19, 26; May 3, 10)
Class meeting times: 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. São Paulo time
**Please note that clock changes around the world happen at different times, and in different directions.  In Brazil clocks will move one hour backward the Sunday before this course starts – February 21; in the US clocks will move one hour forward on March 13; and in Europe clocks will move one hour forward on March 27**

Governments all over the world can both impose costs and generate competitive advantages for multinational companies. Either way multinational companies cannot ignore the impact of governments on their global value chain. This course will focus on political strategies of multinational companies focusing on the relationship between the headquarters, subsidiaries and governments. The course will help students to develop their corporate diplomatic skills.

The course will discuss how multinational companies emerged as global actors, how they negotiate with governments, what corporate diplomacy and corporate diplomats are, how nongovernmental actors can affect companies and how to deal with institutional voids in emerging markets.

The classes will be composed of lectures, invited guests, business cases, discussion forums and other resources that will help students to connect business strategy concepts to international politics, and to connect them to the real world of government-multinational companies’ relationship.

GNAM Students: Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply.

Natural Capital:  Risks and Opportunities in Global Resource Systems
Todd Cort
Yale SOM

January 25 - May 17, 2015  (no classes during Yale SOM spring break, March 15-25)
Class meeting times: Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:30 – 9:50 a.m. EST (please note that our clocks go forward 1 hour on March 13) 

Natural resource constraints affect most, if not all, functional areas of the modern corporation. Many large companies are taking proactive approaches to managing these risks and capturing the opportunities they create. As such, they are increasingly expecting their employees to have a basic familiarity with the environmental and social, as well as the economic, megatrends affecting these systems. 

Introduction to the course, Todd Cort

See video about the creation of the Natural Capital course.

My Journey Began with the Natural Capital Course: A Student’s Perspective

Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply.

Urban Resilience: Complexity, Collaborative Structures, and Leadership Challenges
Murali Chandrashekaran, Sauder, University of British Columbia
Bradford S. Gentry, Yale School of Management and Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Sourav Mukherji, IIM-Bangalore
Gordon Abekah Nkrumah, University of Ghana Business School
Carlos Scheel, EGADE Business School

Dates: January 7 – April 21 (no classes March 3- 18)
Class meeting times: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30–10:45am EST

The world continues to urbanize.  In the 100 years starting 1913, the proportion of the world’s population that live in cities grew 5-fold from 10% to 50%, and estimates suggest that 75% of the world’s population will live in cities in 2050.

Though history reveals that urbanization has always been an accelerator of growth and development, it also poses profound challenges for corporates, communities, cities, and countries.  A recent McKinsey report succinctly notes: “Cities are essential to global economic growth and productivity. They are where most of the world’s population live, work, and play, and they are important to everyone else, too. They are the world’s economic engine, consuming the majority of global power and resources, while generating 80 percent of GDP and 70 percent of greenhouse-gas emissions. Making cities great is the critical infrastructure challenge of this century.”

This course is a collaborative offering to the GNAM network.  It brings together the 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) network, the Rockefeller Foundation, schools in the GNAM (Sauder School of Business, Yale SOM, IIM-B, Ghana Business School, and EGADE Business School), and practitioners from business, government, and civil society to engage with the topic of urban resilience.  For the purposes of this course, we draw on the view of urban resilience articulated by 100RC as the ability of individuals, communities, businesses, institutions, and systems within a city to survive, adapt, and grow in response to acute shocks and chronic stresses they may experience.  Shocks and stresses can bring opportunities for cities to evolve and in some circumstances transform.

The purposes of this course are to help students across the Global Network for Advanced Management:

  • Articulate resilience challenges and opportunities facing global cities
  • Describe the holistic and integrated nature of resiliency and key drivers
  • Work in remote and borderless teams to design collaborative approaches involving business, government and civil society to address urban resilience challenges

It is primarily geared towards graduate-level business students with no prior background in urban resilience, but the following groups of participants may audit the course:

  • Graduate level students from the broader university (e.g., environmental studies, urban design and architecture, land and food systems, and public policy)
  • Chief resiliency officers from the 100RC network
  • Staff in the 100RC network

 


Global Network Courses: September - December 2015

Inclusive Business Models (Sourav Mukherji, IIM-Bangalore)

September 3-December 15, 2015 (There will be a total of 20 class meetings; no class on October 22-23 or November 26–27, and other weeks or days off are tbd)
Class meeting times: Thursdays and Fridays, 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. EST (New Haven time, please note that the course will be taught one hour later after the clocks change in the US on November 1)

 

According to World Bank Development Indicators (2008), close to half of the world's population, over three billion people, live on less than US$ 2.50 per day and about 1.4 billion on less than US$1.25 per day.  In this course students will debate and discuss whether business enterprises can address the needs of the "base of the pyramid" in a financially sustainable manner, as a for-profit business. By analyzing a series of real life case studies of such inclusive businesses, as well as by listening to social entrepreneurs who are running inclusive businesses, the course will reveal the various challenges that are embedded within such business models and some of the creative means by which social entrepreneurs have dealt with such challenges, sometimes successfully and sometimes not.

Mobile Banking Opportunities Across Countries (K. Sudhir, Yale SOM)

September 3-December 15, 2015  (There will be a total of 20 class meetings; no class on October 22-23 or November 26–27, and other weeks or days off are tbd)
Class meeting times: Tuesday and Thursday, 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. EST (New Haven time, please note that the course will be taught one hour later after the clocks change in the US on November 1)

Mobile banking refers to the use of mobile devices to access financial services and conduct commerce.  Though technologies for mobile banking available are pretty standard around the world, the solutions that succeed in various countries diverge.  Students will work in cross-national teams across universities to understand why current business models differ and propose new business models from the perspective of an assigned institution (e.g., bank, telecom provider, startup) that are appropriate for an assigned country or region.  By comparing the solutions proposed by different teams, the course will help students gain insights into strategies for success for different market participants with different competencies and assets across countries.  See Mobile Banking 2015 syllabus >>

New Product Development
Avraham Shtub
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

October 12-December 14, 2015 (Class meeting dates: October 12; October 26; November 2, 16, 30; December 7; Final presentations on December 14) 
Class meeting times: Mondays, 8:00 – 11:00 a.m. EST (New Haven time, please note that the course will be taught one hour later after the clocks change in the US on November 1)

In today's world New Product Development (NPD) is critical to the success and survival of organizations. This course is aimed at teaching the tools and techniques developed to support the NPD process, to gain insight from real NPD success and failure case studies and to implement the tools, techniques and insights in a simulated environment.


Global Network Courses: January - May 2015

International Management & Organizational Structures
Raúl Montalvo
EGADE Business School

February 9-April 6, 2015  (February 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27; March 2, 6, 9, 16, 23; April 6) 
Class meeting times: Mondays and Fridays, 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. (based on the time in Mexico City, CST in Mexico)

Even when today we can talk about a globalized world, it is important to understand that the local, national or regional nature of business is still one of the most important components when strategic decision making takes place. There are many cases of multinational companies which have been very successful locally or regionally and when they try to export their business model abroad the results can be mixed. The markets have such a wide diversity in terms of infrastructure, culture, purchasing power, legal framework, geography, market composition, weather, consumer behavior, amongst others. One can find evidence from many companies that after they went global had to change and adapt their businesses or even further in some cases to rethink it, not only in terms of adapting their products, but also their logistics for delivery, governance and organizational structure, to mention some.  At the end, it is important to understand that the global business environment is influenced by its own environment in a local, regional or national context and how is it that global companies have to adapt internally and externally.

The course will be composed of classes, discussion forums, interviews and a team final project. During the course we will be combining the analysis from three main angles: business context (economic figures of the country or region, business framework, consumer behavior, etc.), business model and business expansion strategy: evidence (case discussion and evidence of the strategy used and its implications when a group of companies from different countries and sectors went global). All of these supported as indicated above with guest speakers who did participate in the expansion of their companies and who will share their experience with the class.

At the end of the course as a final project the students in groups, will have to analyze the best strategy for a local company that may want to become global.

Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply before December 19.

Natural Capital:  Risks and Opportunities in Global Resource Systems
Bradford S. Gentry and Todd Cort
Yale SOM

January 13-May 5, 2015  (no classes during Yale SOM spring break, February 25-March 23)
Class meeting times: Tuesdays and Thursday, 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. EST (please note that our clocks go forward + 1 hour on March 8) 

Natural resource constraints affect most, if not all, functional areas of the modern corporation. Many large companies are taking proactive approaches to managing these risks and capturing the opportunities they create. As such, they are increasingly expecting their employees to have a basic familiarity with the environmental and social, as well as the economic, megatrends affecting these systems.  See video about the Natural Capital course.

My Journey Began with the Natural Capital Course: A Student’s Perspective

Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply before November 19.

Handling Disruption:  Humanitarian emergencies management and development
Chrisanthi Avgerou and Shirin Madon
London School of Economics

January 21-March 19, 2015
Class meeting times: Wednesday and Thursdays, 14:00-15:30 GMT (London time)

This is a course on the management of disasters with a focus on the management and policy challenges of humanitarian emergencies and development. The course places emphasis on the crucial role of information and communication technology (ICT) in information gathering, analysis and coordination for the activities of humanitarian organisations as well as affected communities.

Check with your MBA Program Director about how to apply before November 19.


Global Network Courses: August – December 2014

Analysis of Competition Law and Enforcement Across Countries (Fiona Scott Morton, Edward Snyder, Pierre Cremieux, Yale SOM)

Competition policy and enforcement is now a global phenomenon. Competition and antitrust authorities across the world have been increasingly active in:

  1. prosecuting transnational pricing-fixing conspiracies, e.g., LCD, auto parts;
  2. challenging mergers that span multiple countries, e.g. Google-Motorola, UTCGoodrich, the joint venture between BHP Billington and Rio Tinto; and
  3. changing various practices by large firms across the world, e.g., Intel, Google, and Microsoft.

The fundamental goal of competition laws is the protection of consumers. The overall objectives, design, and actual enforcement practices in any given country may also be affected by other factors, including the protection of domestic industry from foreign competition, concerns about the strength of particular industries, desire for policy consistency across countries, and overall experience with market economies.

Analysis of Competition Law and Enforcement Across Countries will combine classes and discussion groups, and a team research project. The first series of four classes will provide a common economic, legal, and business framework upon which student groups can develop their research projects. The remainder of the course will be focused on the team research projects, examining current or recent antitrust regulatory efforts focused on specific companies under scrutiny for monopolization/unilateral conduct or a group of companies under scrutiny for potential price-fixing behavior.  (Learn more from a short video about the course.)

Inclusive Business Models (Sourav Mukherji, IIM-Bangalore)

According to World Bank Development Indicators (2008), close to half of the world's population, over three billion people, live on less than US$ 2.50 per day and about 1.4 billion on less than US$1.25 per day.  In this course students will debate and discuss whether business enterprises can address the needs of the "base of the pyramid" in a financially sustainable manner, as a for-profit business. By analyzing a series of real life case studies of such inclusive businesses, as well as by listening to social entrepreneurs who are running inclusive businesses, the course will reveal the various challenges that are embedded within such business models and some of the creative means by which social entrepreneurs have dealt with such challenges, sometimes successfully and sometimes not.

Mobile Banking Opportunities Across Countries (K. Sudhir, Yale SOM)

Mobile banking refers to the use of mobile devices to access financial services and conduct commerce.  Though technologies for mobile banking available are pretty standard around the world, the solutions that succeed in various countries diverge.  Students will work in cross-national teams across universities to understand why current business models differ and propse new business models from the perspective of an assigned institution (e.g., bank, telecom provider, startup) that are appropriate for an assigned country or region.  By comparing the solutions proposed by different teams, the course will help students gain insights into strategies for success for different market participants with different competencies and assets across countries.

New Product Development (Avraham Shtub, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology)

In today's world New Product Development (NPD) is critical to the success and survival of organizations. This course is aimed at teaching the tools and techniques developed to support the NPD process, to gain insight from real NPD success and failure case studies and to implement the tools, techniques and insights in a simulated environment.


Global Network Courses: January – May 2014

Natural Capital: Risks and Opportunities in Global Resource Systems

Natural resource constraints affect most, if not all, functional areas of the modern corporation. Many large companies are taking proactive approaches to managing these risks and capturing the opportunities they create. As such, they are increasingly expecting their employees to have a basic familiarity with the environmental and social, as well as the economic, megatrends affecting these systems.

New Product Development

In today's world New Product Development (NPD) is critical to the success and survival of organizations. This course is aimed at teaching the tools and techniques developed to support the NPD process, to gain insight from real NPD success and failure case studies and to implement the tools, techniques and insights in a simulated environment.
 


Global Network Courses: August – December 2013

Analysis of Competition Law and Enforcement Across Countries

Mobile Banking Opportunities Across Countries